Carbon dating of bacteria

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As reported elsewhere also in limestone, fossilized wood, coal, marble, deep groundwater, geological graphite, Mesozoic-layer limestone, and the bones of dinosaurs including the ten described below.And as reported at Science Direct, short-lived 14c is regularly found even in supposedly billion-year-old diamonds!

interdigitated with its neighboring microfibrils... so well ordered as to be crystalline." Further, bacteria do not make collagen, which eliminates another possible source of contamination.(Further, there is a pretreatment process of repeated washes of acid/alkali/acid to remove any outer humic acid and debris.) Therefore creationists have been correct to dispute Mary Schweitzer, Lindgren, et al., as they've tried to explain away as microbial contamination the "modern" carbon in an endogenous biomaterial Mosasaur bone. (See also this post from a committed evolutionist in a battle royale with our old friend rsr.org/david-willis at the forum run by RSR host Fred Williams.) Regarding Libby's "no known natural mechanism" way of contaminating collagen, here's our RSR explanation of why this is.If a specimen is purified to 95% collagen, or 98%, or 99%, etc., then approximately the same percent of the carbon in the fossil sample will be endogenous (i.e., original to the living animal). Because new carbon atoms will not original carbon atoms in the collagen molecule.) Anything even just one million years old should have none of this "modern" carbon.However, scientists are consistently finding 14c everywhere it shouldn't be.

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